CERTIFICATE III IN FITNESS

Download o Muscular tissue which gives the body definition, produces force and causes motion o Epithelial tissue which is the .... Respiratory and c...

1 downloads 227 Views 1MB Size
E PL

SA M

Certificate III in Fitness - Module 4 Health Science and Nutrition

 

CONTENTS  CONTENTS ........................................................................................................................................................................ 1  ADDITIONAL RESOURCES ................................................................................................................................................. 2  OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................................................................................ 3  PART A ‐ APPLY ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY PRINCIPLES IN FITNESS............................................................................ 3  ANATOMICAL TERMINOLOGY ....................................................................................................................................................5  STRUCTURAL LEVELS OF THE HUMAN BODY ...........................................................................................................................9 

E

THE SKELETAL SYSTEM ..............................................................................................................................................................11  BONE DEVELOPMENT ................................................................................................................................................................17  THE MUSCULAR SYSTEM ...........................................................................................................................................................22 

PL

THE CARDIORESPIRATORY SYSTEM .........................................................................................................................................34  THE NERVOUS SYSTEM..............................................................................................................................................................43  THE LYMPHATIC SYSTEM ..........................................................................................................................................................48  THE ENDOCRINE SYSTEM ..........................................................................................................................................................50  ENERGY SYSTEMS .......................................................................................................................................................................55  THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.............................................................................................................................................................60  PART B ‐ PROVIDE HEALTHY EATING INFORMATION TO CLIENTS.................................................................................. 62 

SA M

OVERVIEW OF HEALTHY EATING .............................................................................................................................................62 

DIETARY TRENDS ........................................................................................................................................................................70  SIGNS OF GOOD AND BAD NUTRITION ...................................................................................................................................72  NUTRIENTS ..................................................................................................................................................................................65  CHRONIC DISEASE & NUTRITION .............................................................................................................................................73  DIET AND BODY COMPOSITION ...............................................................................................................................................80  NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS AND INTENSE EXERCISING .................................................................................................81  BODY IMAGE ISSUES ..................................................................................................................................................................81  PROVIDE DIETARY RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................................................................................... 84 

CERTIFICATE III MODULE 4 ASSIGNMENT ...................................................................................................................... 87            

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 1 of 95 

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES  ADDITIONAL READING  Further Readings:  Eating Drinking Before Sport 

Proteins 

Eating and drinking during and after sport 

Vitamin and Mineral Supplements 

Carbohydrates and the glycemic index 

Dietary Guidelines Australia abridged 

E

Fats and Oils 

WEBSITES    

 

betterhealth.vic.gov.au 

Inner Body 

 

 

 

innerbody.com/htm/body.html 

 

 

 

anatomyandphysiologyi.com/ 

 

 

Anatomy & Physiology 

PL

Better Health Channel Victoria 

WEB PAGES & SEARCHES  Search ‘Anatomy quiz’  Search ‘Anatomy pictures’ 

Search ‘Muscular system of the body’ 

SA M

Search ‘How does the cardiovascular system work’ 

Search ‘How does the body produce energy’ 

Search ‘What happens the [insert body system] during exercise’  Search ‘Dietary guidelines Australia’ 

ACTIVITIES  

Throughout this module and the following modules we have created activities for you to complete  which will help your learning and understanding of the topics within each module. These activities  are  not  compulsory  or  marked,  however  we  recommend  they  are  completed  to  help  understand  topics within this module.  

  ACTIVITY 

Complete the following…… 

    PLEASE NOTE: Handouts can be found at the back of the module following page 81. 

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

 

      Page 2 of 95 

 

OVERVIEW   This  module  covers  the  basic  anatomy  and  physiology  related  to  fitness,  as  well  as  looking  at  providing  clients  with  healthy  eating  information.  The  anatomy  and  physiology  section  initially  looks at basic terminology and components of fitness before breaking down each individual system  within the body and applying it to the fitness setting.   

E

The health eating section identifies the difference between good and bad nutrition, which may be  linked to fad diets, as well as examining chronic diseases that may exist within the body that may  result from poor nutrition.  

PL

PART A ‐ APPLY ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY  PRINCIPLES IN FITNESS   WHAT IS ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY? 

ANATOMY is the study of internal and external structure of the body.  

PHYSIOLOGY is the study of how living organisms perform the various functions of life. 

SA M

As  a  fitness  instructor  you  need  to  understand  how  the  relevant  anatomical  and  physiological  concepts apply to the development of a fitness program. Or in other words, you need to first know  how the body works before planning an effective fitness program. 

WHAT IS EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY? 

Exercise physiology is the study of the function of the human body during exercise conditions.  As a fitness instructor understanding how the body reacts, changes and modifies as a result of the  body  undergoing  exercise  is  key  to  planning  and  marinating  successful  fitness  programs  for  your  client.  

COMPONENTS OF FITNESS RECAP 

The components of fitness allow us to be in a state of health, which is a state of complete mental,  physical and social well‐being.   There are five main components to fitness:  

Body Composition  



Cardiovascular Endurance  



Muscular Strength  



Muscular Endurance  

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 3 of 95 

 



Flexibility  

BODY COMPOSITION   Body composition is used to describe the percentages of fat, bone and muscle in the human body.  Body  composition  is  affected  by  factors  such  as  diet  and  exercise.  Muscular  tissue  takes  up  less  space  in  our  body  than  fat  tissue.  Our  body  composition,  as  well  as  our  weight,  determines  lean  mass. 

E

CARDIOVASCULAR ENDURANCE   Cardiovascular endurance is the ability of the heart to deliver blood to working muscles and then  their ability to use it (e.g. running long distances). 

PL

Frequent  and  regular  aerobic  exercise  has  been  shown  to  help  prevent  or  treat  serious  and  life‐ threatening chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, obesity, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes,  insomnia,  and  depression.  Endurance  exercise  before  meals  lowers  blood  glucose  more  than  the  same  exercise  after  meals.  According  to  the  World  Health  Organisation,  lack  of  physical  activity  contributes  to  approximately  17%  of  heart  disease  and  diabetes,  12%  of  falls  in  the  elderly,  and  10%  in  breast  cancer  and  colon  cancer.  Aerobic  exercise  also  works  to  increase  the  mechanical  efficiency  of  the  heart  by  increasing  cardiac  volume  (aerobic  exercise),  or  myocardial  thickness  (strength training).  

SA M

 MUSCULAR STRENGTH  

Muscular  strength  is  the  limit  to  which  muscles  can  exert  force  by  contracting  against  resistance  (e.g. holding or restraining an object or person). 

Strength  refers  to  the  ability  of  muscles  to  generate  force  against  physical  objects  and/or  resistance. In the fitness world, this typically refers to things like how much weight you can lift or  how many push ups you can do. This type of resistance can include dumbbells, barbells, resistance  bands,  machines,  cables  or  your  own  body.  When  lifting  heavy  weight,  you  increase  strength,  muscle size and connective tissues such as ligaments and tendons. The muscular system is made up  of muscles, tendons, ligaments and connective tissue (fascia) that help to support internal organs.  All  of  these  systems  work  together  to  provide  the  body  with  stability  and  posture,  motion,  heat,  circulation and help in digestion.  

MUSCULAR ENDURANCE 

Muscular Endurance is the ability of a muscle or group of muscles to sustain repeated contractions  against a resistance for an extended period of time (e.g. rowing or cycling). It helps to increase bone  mineral  density,  improve  tolerance  to  lactic  acid  concentrations,  and  strengthen  the  integrity  of  muscular connective tissue.      

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 4 of 95 

 

FLEXIBILITY  Flexibility is the ability to achieve an extended range of motion without being impeded by excess  tissue, like fat or muscle (e.g.  executing a leg split). 

ANATOMICAL TERMINOLOGY  

E

Flexibility  refers  to  the  range  of  motion  or  movement  of  a  joint  or  group  of  joints.  The  common  factor affecting flexibility is the inability of the muscles and tendons surrounding a joint to stretch  to  an  optimal  length.  Lack  of  mobility  causes  stiff  joints  and  pain  resulting  in  poor  posture.  Flexibility  lengthens  the  muscle  and  tendon  tissue  surrounding  joints  and  increases  the  range  of  motion.  It  also  assists  in  preventing  injuries,  enhances  biomechanical  efficiency,  coordination  between muscles groups and relieves joint pain and postural issues.  

PL

To best describe the manner in which the body moves and also the positions the body can be in  naturally, we use standard terms to create uniformity in the ranges of movement. 

ANATOMICAL POSITION 

This is used to describe the reference point from which the body moves from. The body stands in  the erect position, arms by the sides with palms facing anterior, feet parallel so that the toes and  head face forwards.  

PRONE AND SUPINE POSITIONS  

SA M

Lying face down is called prone position.   Lying face up is called supine position. 

PLANES OF BODY MOTION 

The body is divided into many planes of motion to describe movement.   

The  SAGITTAL  plane  passes  through  the  body  from  anterior  (front)  to  posterior  (back)  and  divides the body into left and right parts. The movement that exists in this plane is flexion and  extension. I.e. hip flexion  



The FRONTAL (coronal) plane passes through the body from lateral to medial (ear to ear) and  divides the body into anterior and posterior parts. The movement that exists within this plane is  adduction and abduction. I.e. hip abduction.  



The  TRANSVERSE  plane  passes  through  the  body  level  with  the  horizon  and  divides  the  body  into superior (upper) and inferior (lower) parts. The movement that exists within this plane is  rotation, i.e. humeral internal rotation.  

     

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 5 of 95 

SA M

PL

E

 

 

 

  ACTIVITY 

List 3 types of exercise or movement that a relevant to each plane of motion: 

Sagittal  

 

Frontal  

 

Transverse  

 

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 6 of 95 

 

DIRECTIONAL TERMINOLOGY             

E

     

         

SA M

 

PL

 

                             

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 7 of 95 

 

towards the head 

Inferior 

towards the feet 

Anterior 

towards the front of the body 

Posterior 

towards the back of the body 

Medial 

towards the mid‐line of the body 

Lateral 

away from the mid‐line of the body 

Proximal 

towards the attachment point of a limb 

Distal 

away from the attachment of a limb 

External/superficial 

more towards the surface of the body 

Internal/deep 

more towards the inside of the body 

Peripheral 

away from the centre of an anatomical system 

Central 

towards the centre of an anatomical system 

Unilateral 

on one side of the body only 

Bilateral 

on both sides of the body 

Contralateral 

on the opposite side of the body 

Palmar 

on the same side as the palm of the hand 

Plantar 

on the same surface as the sole of the foot 

SA M

PL

E

Superior 

Dorsum 

on either the back of the hand or back (top) of the foot 

MOVEMENT TERMINOLOGY  Flexion 

bending a joint (reducing the angle at a joint) 

Extension 

the act of straightening (increasing the angle of a joint) 

Abduction 

movement away from the midline of the body 

Adduction 

movement towards the midline of body 

Circumduction 

the circular movement of a limb 

Inversion 

turning inward of a limb 

Eversion 

turning outward of a limb 

Horizontal flexion 

moving forward in the horizontal plane 

Horizontal extension  returning to original position  Hyperextension 

refers to the over extension, or moving beyond the normal extension range  

Pronation 

internal rotation of the forearm/hand so the palm is facing downwards or  backwards;  and  a  similar  movement  with  the  foot  where  the  foot/ankle  rolls inwards.  

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 8 of 95 

 

Supination  

external  rotation  of  the  forearm/hand  so  the  palm  is  facing  upwards  or  forwards;  and  a  similar  movement  of  the  foot  where  the  foot/ankle  rolls  outwards  

Plantar flexion  

the action of extending the foot downwards so the plantar (sole) of the foot  faces posterior.  

Dorsi flexion 

the action of flexing the foot downwards so the dorsal (top of the foot) of  the foot faces posterior. 

E

 

List the movement occurring in the following movements:     ACTIVITY 

(tip – use the name of the joint along with the movement i.e. shoulder flexion) 

(up phase) 

Press‐up 

 

(down phase) 

 

SA M

Kicking a ball 

PL

  Bicep Curl 

Sitting down    in a chair 

STRUCTURAL LEVELS OF THE HUMAN BODY  The body is a complex structure which is made up of many different levels, these are described  here:  

1. CHEMICAL LEVEL 

At this level atoms and molecules combine to make organelles, which determine cell function. These  functions can include cell membranes, mitochondria and ribosomes.  

2. CELLULAR LEVEL 

Life begins with one cell. This cell is replicated through a process called mitosis, until the body get a  full set of 46 chromosomes. By adulthood, the body has 10 trillion cells.   The other major function on the cellular level is cellular differentiation, which facilitates the specific  functions  of  cells and  genes  in  the human  body.  Cellular  differentiation  determines  differences  in,  for example, skin, eye and hair colour.   © Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 9 of 95 

 

3. TISSUE LEVEL  There are four distinct types of tissue which are produced when like cells come together:   o Connective tissue which includes bone, blood, and cartilage  o Muscular tissue which gives the body definition, produces force and causes motion  o Epithelial tissue which is the skin that covers the body  o Neural tissue which transmits electrical pulses throughout the body.  

E

4. ORGAN LEVEL  Organs are formed when like tissue comes together and most organs contain all four tissue types.  There are 76 organs in the human body, each performing a specific function such as:  o blood movement (the heart)  

PL

o waste management (the liver and kidneys)   o respiration (the lungs) 

o regulation of body temperature (the skin) 

o glucose maintenance (kidneys and pancreas) 

5. SYSTEM LEVEL 

SA M

All  previously  mentioned  levels come together to form  systems that perform specific  human  functions.  These  organ  systems  include  the  cardiovascular  system  (blood  flow),  the  gastrointestinal  system  (body  waste) and  the  skeletal  system  (human  bones).  In  all,  the  human  body has 11 organ systems.  

6. ORGANISM LEVEL 

This  is  the  final  level,  where  all  the  previous  levels  function  together  and  form  an organism.          

(Sourced from: http://anatomyandphysiologyi.com/)

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 10 of 95 

 

THE SKELETAL SYSTEM 

SA M

PL

E

ANTERIOR SKELETAL SYSTEM 

  © Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 11 of 95 

 

SA M

PL

E

ANTERIOR SKELETAL SYSTEM 

 

SPINAL POSTURE  © Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 12 of 95 

 

Curvatures of the Spine  

SA M

Spinal Movement  

PL

E

The  following  diagram  indicates  the  different  curvatures of the spine in relation to the 4 sections  which  consist  of  the  cervical,  thoracic,  lumbar  and  sacral spine. 

 

 

The  next  diagram  shows  the  degrees  of  movement  possible  by  the  cervical  spine,  the  include;  lateral  flexion  (tilting  the  head  from  side  to  side),  flexion  and  extension  (bring  the  chin  closer  to  the  chin  and  then  further  away  from  the  chin,  and  lateral  rotation  (looking left or right whilst keeping  the body facing forward). 

The diagram to the right indicates  the  movement  permitted  at  the  thoracic  and  lumbar  spine,  this  include;  lateral  flexion  (side  bending),  Flexion  and  extension  (bending  forward  and  back  from  the  hips)  and  rotation  (look  left  and  right  moving  from  the  lower  part of trunk) 

   

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 13 of 95 

 

POSTURAL DEIVATION OF THE SKELETAL SYSTEM  Kyphosis   This  postural  deviation  involves  the  increased  kyphotic  curve  of  the  thoracic  spine  creating  a  hunchback or slouching posture. The thoracic spine has a naturally rounded curve; however, in this  condition  the  rounding  is  exaggerated.  The  following  table  indicates  the  areas  that  are  likely  to  need addressing and exercises that can improve the condition:  Muscles that are likely to be  weak and stretched include:  

o

latissimus dorsi  

o

abdominals  

o

pectorialis minor  

o

gluteals  

o

pectorialis major 

o

intercostals  

o

internal oblique  

o

anterior deltoid  

o

Seated rows 

o

Supermans  

o

Abdominal stretch 

o

Resistitive scapula  retraction  

o

Reverse fly  

o

Back extensions  

PL

Lordosis 

 

Exercises to help this  condition include:  

E

Muscles that are likely to be  shortened and tight include:  

SA M

Lordosis is a condition where lumbar spine has an over exaggerated lordotic curve (inward curve). A  healthy  spine  possesses  a  small  degree  of  a  lordotic  curvature;  however,  similar  to  kyphotic  the  curvature goes beyond the naturally healthy level. The following table indicates the areas that are  likely to need addressing and exercises that can improve the condition:  Muscles that are likely to be  shortened and tight include:  

Muscles that are likely to be  weak and stretched include:  

Exercises to help this  condition include:  

o

Iliopsoas 

o

Iliopsoas  

o

Bridge  

o

Rectus femoris  

o

Rectus femoris  

o

Hip flexor stretch  

o

Lower back erector spinae 

o

Lower back erector spinae 

o

Abdominal crunch  

Scoliosis  

Scoliosis  is  a  postural  deviation  where  they  spine  is  unnaturally  curved  laterally.  The  diagram  on  the  right  indicates  the  lateral  curvature  of  the  spine.  This  condition  is  usually accompanied with vertebral rotation  causing the ribs to rotate.  

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 14 of 95 

 

FUNCTION OF THE SKELETAL SYSTEM  Differently  shaped  bones  that  join  together  in  a  collection  form  the  shape  of  the  human  body.  When  two  bones  meet  they  make  a  joint.  The  soft  tissues  of  the  body  are  supported  by  the  skeleton  for  maintenance  of  form  and  posture.  Vital  organs  are  also  protected  by  the  strong  structure of the skeleton. Bones store important minerals like calcium, for muscle contractions and  transmission  of  nervous  system  messages  and  phosphorus,  used  for  normal  cell  functionality.  Therefore the specific functions of the skeletal system include:  

E

o Protection  –  acts  as  a  protective  structure  for  vital  organs.  Some  examples  include  the  skull  protecting the brain and the lungs being protected by the rib cage.  o Support – the skeletal system provides the framework of the body’s shape, without it the body  would not be kept upright.  

PL

o Movement – individual bones within the skeletal system connect together to form joints. There  are  several  different  types  of  joints  which  allow  limited  movement  planes  (explained  later).  Movement occurs from the muscles which are attached to each bone within the joint.   o Blood  production  –  skeletal  bones  consist  of  cancellous  bone  (spongy  bone)  that  contains  redbone marrow the blood cell production component.   o Mineral  storage  –  the  bone  can  also  store  minerals  within  its  structure.  Calcium  us  stored  within bone matrix and iron can be stored within the bone marrow.  

SA M

There  are  206  bones  in  the  body  connected  by  a  variety  of  joints.  Muscles  produce  force  that  causes movement to occur at the joints. The skeleton is further divided into the axial skeleton and  appendicular skeleton.  

The axial skeleton consists of the:  o skull and facial bone  

o sternum  o ribs  

o vertebral column 

 

The appendicular skeleton consists of: 

o The pectoral girdle and the  arm‐scapula,  clavicle,  humerus,  radius,  ulna,  carpals,  metacarpals  and  phalanges  o The  pelvic  girdle  and  the  legs – the ilium,   o ischium,  pubis,  femur,  patella, tibia, fibula, tarsals,  metatarsals and phalanges 

      © Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 15 of 95 

 

BONES   Structure of long bone   Articular  Cartilage:  This  is  a  layer  of  tough  tissue  located at the end of the bone. It acts to provide a  smooth  and  lubricated  surface  for  articulation  between two bones at a joint.  

E

Periosteum: This is a thick membrane which covers  the  outer  layer  of  a  bone,  apart  from  the  end  of  long bones.  

PL

Compact  bone:  one  of  the  main  components  of  bone, it makes up one of two types of bone tissue.  Its role is to create and provide a strong structure  within the bone.  

Cancellous bone: also known as spongy bone, this  is the second type of tissue which constitutes bone  tissue.  It  is  a  weaker,  less  dense  structure  that  contains red bone marrow for blood production to  occur.  

SA M

Bony epiphyseal line:  In children and adolescents,  this  line  is  called  an  epiphyseal  plate  and  is  made  of  hyaline  cartilage.  Referred  to  as  the  growing  plate,  it  is  location  where  growth  takes  place  within  the  bone.  In  adulthood,  when  growing  stops,  this  hyaline  cartilage  (plate)  turns  into  an  epiphyseal plate.                    

 

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 16 of 95 

 

THE CARDIORESPIRATORY SYSTEM  OVERVIEW OF THE CARDIORESPIRATORY SYSTEM 

E

The cardiorespiratory system is a combination of  the  cardiovascular  system  and  the  respiratory  system  working  together.  The  cardiorespiratory  system  is  made  up  of  the  heart,  blood  vessels  (cardio  elements),  two  lungs  and  airways  (respiratory  elements).  The  heart  and  lungs  work  together  to  provide  the  body  with  adequate levels of oxygen to enable survival.  

PL

This system and all its components work  together to transport gases to and from the  lungs and cells within the body.  

SA M

This  system  functions  together  as  a  whole,  but  each  component  has  individual  roles  to  play.  It  begins  with  the  respiratory  system  inhaling  of  gases (mostly important gas being oxygen) from  the surrounding environment into the lungs. To  reach  the  lungs  air  travels  down  the  trachea  (windpipe) before the trachea branches off into  a  left  and  right  bronchus  (stiff  cartilage  and  smooth  muscle  make  up  the  trachea  and  bronchi).  To  ensure  the  air  is  clean  mucus  is  secreted  in  these  airways  to  filter  dust  and  particles  in  the  air.  The  air  continues  to  travel  through  these  smaller  airways  in  the  lungs  called  bronchioles  and  finally  into  the  alveoli  (air  sacs)  of  the  lungs.  The  alveoli  are  surrounded  by  tiny  blood vessels known as capillaries.  Once in the lungs gaseous exchange occurs, which is where oxygen that has reached the alveoli is  transported through the alveolar walls into the blood vessels. At the same time carbon dioxide is  exchanged in the opposite direction moving from the blood vessels to the alveoli.   The carbon dioxide is simply forced out the body during exhalation of the lungs.  

The  next  stage  is  the  transportation  of  the  oxygen  within  the  blood  which  is  called  gaseous  transport and is now the responsibility of the cardiovascular system. The blood travels back to the  heart from the lungs where it is pumped out to the rest of the body.     

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 34 of 95 

 

THE PROCESS OF TRANSPORTING AND EXCHANGING OXYGEN AND CARBON  DIOXIDE   In  physiology,  respiration  is  defined  as  the  transport  of  oxygen  from  the  outside  air  to  the  cells  within tissues, and the transport of carbon dioxide in the opposite direction. The respiratory system  works with the circulatory system to carry gases to and from the tissues.  In air‐breathing vertebrates like ourselves, respiration of oxygen includes four stages:  Ventilation – moving of the ambient air into and out of the alveoli of the lungs. 



Pulmonary  gas  exchange  –  exchange  of  gases  between  the  alveoli  and  the  pulmonary  capillaries. 



Gas transport – movement of gases within the pulmonary capillaries through the circulation  to the peripheral capillaries in the organs, and then a movement of gases back to the lungs  along the same circulatory route. 



Peripheral gas exchange – exchange of gases between the tissue capillaries and the tissues  or organs, impacting the cells composing these and mitochondria within the cells. 

PL

E



Respiratory  and  cardiovascular  activities  are  intensified  during  exercise.  However,  respiratory  activity  is  highly  voluntary  (you  can  control  your  breathing)  compared  to  cardiovascular  activity  which is totally involuntary. 

MAIN MUSCLES IN RESPIRATION  

SA M

During respiration, there are several muscles which have the ability to assist with respiration. These  can  be  broken  down  into  main  muscles  that  are  used  during  normal  breathing  and  accessory  muscles  which  are  additional  muscles  that  are  active  during  elevated  breathing,  mainly  during  exercise. Some of the main muscles are also mainly function during inspiration or expirations and  this will be indicated in the description of the muscle.  

Main muscles used during respiration:  

Diaphragm: the main muscle used in respiration controlling the volume of the lungs, it is located at  the base of the lungs. It contracts to flatten and increases the volume within the thoracic region to  draw  air  into  the  lungs  (inhalation).  It  then  relaxes  and  bulges  upwards  to  push  air  out  the  lungs  (exhalation).   Internal  and  external  intercostal  muscles:  located  inbetween  the  ribs,  these  muscles  act  as  a  synergist  to  the  diaphragm  contracting  and  relaxing  to  increase  and  decrease  the  lung  space,  assisting inhalation and exhalation.   Scalenes: the scalenes have a small role during normal breathing, which is to help stabilise the first  and second ribs.  

Accessory muscles used during respiration:   Sternocleidomastoid  and  Scalenes:  helping  elevate  the  ribs  during  forced  respiration,  this  aids  inspiration.   © Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 35 of 95 

 

Rectus  abdominals  and  External  Obliques:  these  muscles  help  respiration  in  two  different  ways;  firstly they help depress the ribs during expiration, forcing air out more rapidly; and secondly they  compress the internal organs which they lie above, helping push the diaphragm upwards.  

STRUCTURE OF HEART   The heart is made up of three layers:   o Pericardium – thin protective outer  layer. 

o Endocardium  –  thin  inner  lining  of  the muscle.  

E

o Myocardium – thick muscular wall. 

PL

The  heart  is  split  up  into  4  chambers,  the  two  top  chambers  are  called  the  atrium  (left  and  right)  and  the  two  bottom  chambers  are  called  the  ventricles  (left  and  right).  The  atrium  chambers  receive  blood  into  the  heart  and  the  ventricles  chambers  pump  blood  away  from  the  (Illustration sourced from http://www.heartfoundation.org.au/) heart. There are two main blood vessels which are attached to the heart, which are:  

SA M

o Aorta – is the main artery which exits the heart and is pumped out by the left ventricle   o Vena Cava – is the main vein which returns the blood back to the heart and enters into the  right atrium 

Within the heart there are several valves which help prevent the backflow of blood into chambers,  these include: tricuspid valve and mitral valve. 

CARDIAC CYCLE  

 

Stage 1 – The blood enters the right atrium of the heart via the vena cava veins.   Stage 2 – Once in the right atrium, the blood is pumped into the right ventricular  Stage  3  –  From  the  right  ventricle,  the  blood  is  pumped  through  the  pulmonary  arteries  to  the  lungs.  Stage 4 – The blood then re‐enters the heart from the lungs into the left atrium.  

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 36 of 95 

 

Stage 5 – The blood is then pumped into the left ventricle where it is pumped out through the aorta  to the rest of the body. 

BLOOD PRESSURE   Blood  pressure  is  the  pressure  the blood  exerts  on  the  artery  walls  and  is  considered  during  two  different stages of the cardiac cycle – systolic and diastolic.   Systolic measures the pressure exerted on the artery walls whilst the blood is being pumped out of  the heart to the rest of the body.  

E

Diastolic measures the pressure exerted on the artery walls whilst the blood is resting (or not being  pumped out to the rest of the body).  

PL

When  blood  pressure  is  taken,  it  will  produce  two  readings  giving  the  above  measurements.  The  diastolic is the lower number as there will be less pressure exerted when the heart is resting.    How blood pressure is controlled 

Blood pressure is usually measured using a sphygmomanometer and is measure in mmHg. 

SA M

An  individual’s  blood  pressure  can  change  quite  often  throughout  the  day  as  a  result  of  daily  stimulants. The body changes blood pressure using receptors that are within the smooth muscular  wall  of  the  arterioles.  These  receptors  detect  how  relaxed  or  constricted  the  vessels  are.  Any  narrowing will restrict flow causing less blood to be transported through the vessels and around the  body.  This  is  then  relayed  onto  the  brain,  which  stimulates  a  nervous  and  hormonal  reaction,  inducing the heart to beat faster and overcome the restriction. As a result this causes high blood  pressure, and can occur for short periods of time; however, if it is prolonged then hypertension is  developed.    Normal blood pressure is considered to be 120/80.   Effects of exercise on blood pressure  

The effect of exercise on blood pressure can be related to short‐term affects or long‐term effects,  they consist of the following:  

Short‐term  effects  –  during  exercise  the  body  requires  additional  oxygen  and  nutrients,  so  to  achieve this, the cardiovascular and the respiratory systems work harder. The heart, a component  of the cardiovascular system, is required to pumper harder and faster to push more blood around  the  body.  As  a  result,  the  pressure  exerted  on  the  artery  walls  increases  during  the  contraction  phase  but  remains  constant  during  the  relaxation  of  the  heart.  Therefore  systolic  blood  pressure  increases and diastolic blood pressure remains relatively constant.    Long‐term effect – the long term effects of exercise include the decrease in blood pressure at rest.  This is achieved as a result of the heart and cardiovascular system being more efficient when the  body is not exercising. To achieve this long term effect, exercise is must be performed on a regular  basis, over a long period of time.  

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 37 of 95 

 

SYSTEMIC AND PULMONARY CIRCULATION   The  following  illustration  shows  the  circulation  system  and  the  route  it  takes.  Systemic circulation is the circulation from  the  heart  to  the  whole  body,  whereas  pulmonary circulation is the name given to  the circulation of blood passed the lungs.  

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF  BLOOD VESSELS 

PL

Within  the  cardiovascular  system,  there  are several different types of blood vessels  which  have  different  structures.  These  include:  

E

 

SA M

Arteries  –  these  are  blood  vessels  which  transport blood away from the heart (with  the  exception  of  the  pulmonary  artery  which  transports  blood  from  the  lungs  to  the  heart).  The  blood  transported  by  arteries are always oxygenated.  

Veins  –  These  are  blood  vessels  that  transport  blood  towards  the  heart  (with  the  exception  of  the  pulmonary  vein  which  transports  blood  from  the  heart  to  the  lungs).  Veins  always carry deoxygenated blood.   Capilaries – these are blood vessels which attach arteries and veins and are responsible for allowing  gases to diffuse in and out to and from other cells.  

 

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 39 of 95 

 

THE CARDIORESPIRATORY SYSTEM AND EXERCISE  The cardiovascular system serves five important functions during exercise:   o Delivers oxygen to working muscles  o Oxygenates blood by returning it to the lungs  o Transports heat (a by‐product of activity) from the core to the skin  o Delivers nutrients and fuel to active tissues  o Transports hormones  

E

Exercise places an increased demand on the cardiovascular system. Oxygen demand by the muscles 

PL

increases  sharply.  Metabolic  processes  speed  up  and  more  waste  is  created.    Also  AN   increased  amount of heat is produced from the increased metabolism; therefore the whole body temperature  will rise.   To  perform  as  efficiently  as  possible  the  cardiovascular  system  must  regulate  these  changes  and  meet the body’s increasing demands. 

HEART RATE 

SA M

Your  heart  rate  is  an  important  guide  for  your  exercise  program  because  it  can  tell  you  how  exercise  is  affecting  you.  Your  heart  rate  can  be  used  to  measure  intensity  of  exercise  as  well  as  gains in fitness. Knowing what to expect and how to gauge your heart rate can make your exercise  program more effective. 

MAXIMAL HEART RATE 

Maximal heart rate is the greatest heart rate that can be measured when individuals are exercising  to  the  point  of  stopping  because  they  cannot  exercise  longer.  Several  equations  have  been  developed to estimate maximal heart rate:    Maximal heart rate = 220 minus age (low estimate)    Maximal heart rate = 210 minus [0.5 x age] (high estimate)    Maximal heart rate = 226 minus age (estimate for older individuals)  

Maximal heart rate can, however, vary greatly among different individuals of the same age. 

SUBMAXIMAL HEART RATE 

Submaximal heart rate is where the heart is beating below the maximal heart rate.   A submaximal heart rate is a rate at which an individual can sustain for a period of time, whereas a  maximal heart rate would be too high to sustain.   Aerobic Exercise  Aerobic exercise is any sustainable activity that causes a rise in the heart rate. This activity must be  done  for  at  least  three  minutes  at  a  higher  than  resting  intensity.  As  the  intensity  of  aerobic  © Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 40 of 95 

 

exercise increases, so does your heart rate. When maximum capacity of work is achieved your heart  rate  will  plateau.  Aerobic  exercise  can  be  performed  in  various  modes.  Exercises  which  involve  upright  positions  like  jogging  will  result  in  an  increased  heart  rate  compared  to  those  done  in  a  seated or reclined position like bike riding or swimming.   Resistance Training 

RATING OF PERCEIVED EXERTION (RPE) 

E

Resistance training done with or without movement causes an increase in heart rate. However, this  increase is different from aerobic exercise. An increase in heart rate from resistance training is due  to  an  increased  after‐load  in  the  heart,  whereas  during  aerobic  exercise  it  is  due  to  an  increased  volume of blood being moved throughout the body.  

PL

Also explained in module 2, the RPE is most commonly used in cardiovascular training but can just  as easily be applied to strength training. It is a subjective rating that the person exercising assigns to  the intensity of their exercise based on their perception of how hard the physical exertion was.  

When you ask a client how hard they are training on a scale of one to ten, you are asking for their  RPE.  

SA M

If the client answers that they are at a 10 (they are probably lying because at 10 you can’t talk!) it  would equate to lifting to failure, or collapsing at the end of a run from exhaustion. It means they  have  exhausted  all  the  energy  or  strength  that  they  have.  An  RPE  of  between  1  ‐  5  would  be  consistent with a warm up or cool down.  

OXYGEN DEMANDS FOR FITNESS ACTIVITIES  Aerobic exercise includes lower intensity activities performed for longer periods of time.   Activities such as walking, running, circuits, cycling and swimming require a great deal of oxygen to  generate the energy needed for prolonged exercise (i.e. aerobic energy expenditure). However, in  sports  which  require  repeated  short  bursts  of  exercise,  it  is  the  anaerobic  system  that  enables  muscles  to  recover  for  the  next  burst.  This  includes  sports  such  as  weightlifting  and  sprinting.  Training for many sports demands that both energy producing systems be developed. 

SHORT TERM PHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES OF THE CARDIORESPIRATORY  SYSTEM WITH EXERCISE  When an individual participates in an exercise program or any physical activity, there are short term  changes which occur to the cardiorespiratory system. These include:   o Increased capillary dilation  

o Blood shunting to working muscles   o Increased temperature within the working muscles   o Development of micro‐tears to the muscles    © Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 41 of 95 

 

PHYSIOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS OF THE CARDIORESPIRATORY SYSTEM   Following a cardiovascular endurance focused exercise program, there are some adaptations which  occur to cardiovascular system. These include:   o Heart size – the muscular walls of the heart hypertrophy (especially the left ventricle). This  makes the heart a more powerful pump, enabling it to push more blood around the body.   o Increase volume of blood vessels around the muscles and alveoli in the lungs.   o Blood pressure – as explained earlier, the blood pressure decreases following a long period  of exercise.  

E

o Volume of blood pumped out the heart changes: 

o Stroke volume (SV) – this is the amount of blood that leaves the heart in one pump.  As a result of the being a more powerful muscle the SV increases 

PL

o Decrease resting heart rate – as a result of the heart becoming more efficient, it does not  have to pump as often to deliver the same amount of blood. This is a result of more blood  being pumped in one pump.   o Venous  return  becomes  more  efficient,  so  blood  returns  to  the  heart  through  the  veins  easier.   o The  red  blood  cells  increase  their  capacity  to  pick  up  and  transport  oxygen  and  carbon  dioxide. Therefore circulating blood has oxygen extracted more effectively. 

SA M

o Lung  capacity  increases  –  the  ability  or  the  lungs  to  expand  and  inhale  oxygen  increases.  This can be a result of increased muscles involved in breathing.  o Improve  respiratory  muscles  –  the  diaphragm  and  intercostal  muscles  hypertrophy  and  increase their capacity to perform (reducing their fatigue level)  o Increase number of alveoli in the lungs for gases exchange.  

 

  ACTIVITY 

Explain what blood pooling is and how it can be avoided: 

Blood pooling    definition 

How to avoid    blood pooling 

 

© Australian College of Sport & Fitness                                                   Certificate III ‐Module 4 ‐ Course Notes ‐ 1405B 

      Page 42 of 95